29.4.11

Salmon Images for Wes

29" Salmon

...detail of 29" Salmon...

...irridescence on 29" Salmon.

...15"-17" Salmon...

33" Salmon with one-of-kind tail


17" Red Salmon

Detail 16" Green Salmon

16" Green Salmon

17" amber salmon

17" Olive Salmon

17" Indigo Salmon

16" Salmon

Stack o' Salmon

Big Reds

Sakana! (AKA Plan C)

As time was running out for my project, I started Plan C, two pate de verre glass halves of salmon that I would stitch together to create one beautiful fish...

... two halevs, wet and shiny from cleaning off the plaster...

... two halves stitched together, but still finless...

... view form top...

... view from one side...

.. and fins that were cast separately, glued and taped on... had to leave before the glue dried, and haven't seen the fish in 'presentation form' yet... soon, I hope!
I'm calling it By a Thread.
OATKA Glass, the place to work and learn for sure!!

25.4.11

OK OK... just a few more memories...

Amanda... in the rain... in New York city!

Lance bought a new cap for the day, it was getting wetter and colder by the minute....

... and Anna decided to Trump-it-Up!

In the meantime, here's a sample of reality as portrayed by an ad in the subway.

23.4.11

The Cracked Fish

This is how it works... wax carving, silicone mold, mother mold, two-layer mold around wax, melt wax out, fill with glass, dry, put in kiln to dry, bring up to temp, charge it with glass until it is really full, anneal in kiln for about a week,  and then finally get the chance to see what happened...

... salmon appearing...

... glass sprues attached, lots of junk, hours of cold working to be done...

...major pieces cut off, and the fish cracked b/c I started to work on it too soon...

... tile saw cuts to remove chunks...

... after sanding and scrubbing for quite some time, the fish is almost ready to fit fins (that were carved, cast, and cold worked separately)

... nice light fins (mostly clear) that would have been a nice contrast to the darker-looking fish body...
Someday, I will re-invest the fish body and cast it again. And then wait for at least a week before I start to polish and complete the piece.

21.4.11

New Heads

Downtown NYC... many very pricey and exclusive stores... most places have buzzers and guards at the door, one has to be judged worthy of entering the premises... so of course, when I saw this particular vignette:

... I HAD to try to get into the shop for this opportunity:

... it was touch-and-go, but at the last second they let me pose for the photo. Apparently, the expressions on the faces of the staff while we were discussing how to best position my head, were priceless.

20.4.11

Test-driving SOFA's

During my stay at O-AT-KA Glass School, I had the opportunity to go to New York City for almost two days... needless to say I saw a LOT! I was so pleased to be able to attend SOFA while there...

... finding shapes and sculptural structures that appeal...

...losing things like my bag...

...loving the architecture-- great doors at the Armory where SOFA was held.

19.4.11

Rainy Days and Dead Umbrellas

Rainy days in New York City...

... really bring out the sunshine colours in taxi cabs...

... which are quite the set-up in the big city.

The aftermath of the rain and the GUSTY streets are remnants of destroyed umbrellas...

... blue...

... gathered up...

...still going.

15.4.11

Fish Times at O-AT-KA Glass!

So... building a fish from glass is a BIG process... to finish off the project, I took a trip to O-AT-KA Glass School to take a master class with Anna Boothe.

We built a rubber mold around the wax that I had carved...

... and then a mother mold around the rubber mold...  
... but the rubber mold allowed me to build another wax mold that I built another mold for (that would be fired in the kiln)...

... it's a big mother ... mold...

... new wax out...

... added sprues to the wax, and removed tail and fins (too thin, the glass won't flow into those spaces, so I have to cast separate molds for each on of them, and codl work them, then glue them ontot the fish when that actually comes out of the kiln...)

Building the other mother mold...

... lots of clay, plaster, silica...

... indispensible duct tape...

...chicken wire for support...

..and finally, the mother of all mother molds, that went into the kiln... I won't see what comes out for about 7 days... so I'll keep you posted, and as for me, fingers will be crossed...
I am very grateful to my sweet friends Lance and Amanda Taylor who own the glass school, for taking me in for this project, and to Anna Boothe for all her help and info that was more than she had planned for her class. Hopefully we will be a happy village of fish-builders when I can finally see what happened during the firing process!